Japanese House - Gig Review and Interview

2nd March 2016

20 February 2016, O2 Academy Newcastle

 

For Amber Bain, a.k.a the Japanese House, it surely won’t take long to become incredibly famous. The way she was discovered probably makes every girl at least a little bit jealous. Amber was dancing to The 1975, in the first row at a gig, as every fan would do, not knowing that that night would actually be life-changing for her. Then, something extraordinary happened: Mattie ran in the crowd after Amber’s best friend and asked her out. Although they dated for more than a year, perhaps the real winner of this unexpected fairytale was indeed the third wheel, Amber. She could never have guessed that in a year’s time, she would be going on tour to Australia with The 1975 … This is proof why you shouldn’t stop believing in the everyday magic of life, wherever you go. Or at least that’s what I tell myself.

 

Before the gig, we were lucky enough to catch Amber backstage: we bonded over a ‘serious’ conversation about hangovers and bad colds – funnily enough, we all had the symptoms of both. At the start of the interview, we were a bit shy and awkward as we had no idea what to expect, and it didn’t help that we are obsessed with her music – however, thanks to Amber, who was super easygoing, we managed to loosen up a bit.

 

When it came to the actual show, it took approximately five seconds for the Japanese House to enchant the crowd. Swaying from side to side, I felt like floating on a huge cloud that was the music itself. Interestingly, the femininity of Amber’s voice was a lot more distinguishable live. The only downside of the gig was its length: it lasted only 45 minutes, as she hasn’t released a full album of original songs yet. However, we got to hear a brand new one played live for the second time ever, called “Leon”. It did have a different sound than the rest of the songs, and carried with it that growing up sensation. I was glad to see that we were among the youngest people in the crowd, which means that Amber’s music has a chance to go beyond the stage of being a teen idol and attract people who actually care more about the sound and lyrics of the music, than the singer’s appearance.

 

The Japanese House’s true uniqueness lies exactly in this – as Amber mentioned in our interview, she aims at creating an identity as well as label-free music that is for the pure joy of the ears and soul. In 2016, we can expect the release of her first full album. Given her rapidly growing popularity, you’d better catch her in a dusty rouge venue before she becomes far too popular for that indie taste of yours.

Reply to this post